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MEDICATIONS




ZARONTIN (Ethosuximide)



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Ethosuximide (Zarontin) is an antiepileptic drug used for treating seizures. It is usually used for absence (petit mal) seizures. It may be used alone or in combination with other antiepileptic agents.

What side effects can be caused by Zarontin?



Like other drugs, Zarontin can cause side effects. If you experience any side effects that are bothersome, report them to your doctor. (There is a risk of serious side effects, including death, with all medications that are used to treat seizures. However, this risk is exceedingly small.)
  1. Changes in mood or behavior may occur; such as drowsiness, irritability, sleep disturbances, or dizziness.
  2. Sometimes, stomach upset may occur (loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting, or stomach cramps). You may take Zarontin with food to avoid mild nausea.
  3. Headaches, hiccups, and low blood counts may also occur.
  4. An allergic skin rash or itching may develop. It is important to report any rashes to your doctor. Unusual or persistent fevers, swollen glands, sore throat, mouth ulcers, bleeding or bruising may also be symptoms of an allergic reaction that should be reported to your doctor.
Women who plan to have children should consult with the doctor about the possible effects of the fetus.

How should I take my medications?



Zarontin is usually taken twice day, in the morning at bedtime. Do not stop this medication without the advice of your doctor, doing so may result in an increase in seizures.

Can I take Zarontin with food or other medications?



Yes, Zarontin may be taken with meals in most patients and at the same time as other prescribed medications. Bring a list of all other medications to your doctor.

What should I do if I miss a dose?



If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember. Try to take the correct daily dose. It is important that you not run out of medication. Always have at least one week's supply of medication on hand. You or your pharmacist can call your doctor's office in order to obtain refills.

Why is my blood checked for Zarontin?



The blood sample is a way to measure the amount of Zarontin in your body. This information can be used to adjust your daily Zarontin dose. It is helpful if you tell your doctor when your last dose of Zarontin was taken.

© 2004 The Neurological Institute of New York • Columbia Comprehensive Epilepsy Center. 710 W 168th St, New York, NY 10032. Phone: 212-305-1742
Department of Neurology | Columbia University Medical Center | Last updated: December 12, 2012 | Comments
 

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